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The Company of Communicators has several
affiliations with military units engaged in
communications across the Navy, Army and
Airforce as well as the Pen and Sword Club.

Our affiliations provide support to our members in the Reserve forces by sharing best practice, offering advice
and training in specialist areas.

The contribution of our Reserve and full time forces is recognised annually by the Company at its annual
Military Dinner where exceptional work in communication is recognised by our Military Awards.

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The Royal Navy's
Media Operations
Specialisation

The Royal Naval Reserve and Royal Marines Reserve form the Maritime Reserve - the fifth fighting arm of the Royal Navy comprising 3,000 men and women from all backgrounds who train and work alongside full-time sailors and Royal Marines on a part-time basis and in times of crisis. They are a fully integrated part of the Royal Navy's total strength. ​The Royal Navy relies on the Media Operations Specialists (MOS) of the Royal Naval Reserve to 1. Train the Royal Navy to interact with the media 2. Provide guidance and support to the Royal Navy in situations where the media is involved. The day-to-day work of the MOS includes escorting journalists to deployed ships and operational theatres, advising senior officers on communications strategies and briefing them prior to interviews, generating stories and coordinating output, monitoring foreign media, training personnel prior to deployment, and protecting service personnel and their loved ones in emotionally-charged situations. The fact that so many MOS officers and photographers have been so busy is testament not only to the high tempo of operations, requests for embeds and international exercises, but also the importance of good internal and external communications to defence. A member of the MOS can find themselves on board a warship one day, scrambling into helicopters on another, and then racing ashore with the green berets of the Royal Marines. It's a job with plenty of variety where no day is ever the same. In the past few years, the MOS have worked in headquarters roles, campaign planning in Afghanistan, Iraq, Bahrain, Naples and the UK. They have also served at sea off the coasts of Libya, Somalia, Sierra Leone, in the Arabian Gulf, the Caribbean as well onboard HMS Queen Elizabeth, the Royal Navy's fleet flagship.

Army
Engagement and
Communications

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As the Army's communications experts, the Engagement and Communications (E&C) team provide the British Army with guidance on all aspects of engagement and communications to support its core purpose: "Conduct coherent and influential internal and external communication in order to improve understanding of the British Army and maintain, protect and enhance its reputation." The day-to-day work of the MOS includes escorting journalists to deployed ships and operational theatres, advising senior officers on communications strategies and briefing them prior to interviews, generating stories and coordinating output, monitoring foreign media, training personnel prior to deployment, and protecting service personnel and their loved ones in emotionally-charged situations. The fact that so many MOS officers and photographers have been so busy is testament not only to the high tempo of operations, requests for embeds and international exercises, but also the importance of good internal and external communications to defence. A member of the MOS can find themselves on board a warship one day, scrambling into helicopters on another, and then racing ashore with the green berets of the Royal Marines. It's a job with plenty of variety where no day is ever the same. In the past few years, the MOS have worked in headquarters roles, campaign planning in Afghanistan, Iraq, Bahrain, Naples and the UK. They have also served at sea off the coasts of Libya, Somalia, Sierra Leone, in the Arabian Gulf, the Caribbean as well onboard HMS Queen Elizabeth, the Royal Navy's fleet flagship.

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We connect the strength, impact and fellowship of
the communication profession with the history,
dynamism and future of the City of London.

7644 SQN RAF
Media Reserves

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7644 Sqn provides an important readiness capability to deliver specialist media operations support to Air and Joint media operations. Air Media & Communications rely on 7644 Sqn to deliver some of the main media outputs for its various campaigns and to provide unparalleled expertise on exercises, operations and campaign media planning. The day-to-day work of the MOS includes escorting journalists to deployed ships and operational theatres, advising senior officers on communications strategies and briefing them prior to interviews, generating stories and coordinating output, monitoring foreign media, training personnel prior to deployment, and protecting service personnel and their loved ones in emotionally-charged situations. The fact that so many MOS officers and photographers have been so busy is testament not only to the high tempo of operations, requests for embeds and international exercises, but also the importance of good internal and external communications to defence. A member of the MOS can find themselves on board a warship one day, scrambling into helicopters on another, and then racing ashore with the green berets of the Royal Marines. It's a job with plenty of variety where no day is ever the same. In the past few years, the MOS have worked in headquarters roles, campaign planning in Afghanistan, Iraq, Bahrain, Naples and the UK. They have also served at sea off the coasts of Libya, Somalia, Sierra Leone, in the Arabian Gulf, the Caribbean as well onboard HMS Queen Elizabeth, the Royal Navy's fleet flagship.